In 2014, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services extended coverage to victims of rare cancers not previously considered. These cancers included treatment for malignant neoplasms of the brain, pancreatic cancer, testicular cancer and invasive cervical cancer. The term “rare cancers” are defined as any cancer with an incidence rate of less than 15 cases per 100,000 persons per year.

 

The list of rare cancers which are covered for 9/11 compensation and benefits includes:

 

  • Malignant neoplasms of the adrenal glands;
  • Malignant neoplasms of other endocrine glands;
  • Malignant neoplasms of the anus and anal canal;
  • Malignant neoplasms of the bone and articular cartilage;
  • Malignant neoplasms of the breast among men;
  • Malignant neoplasms of the gallbladder or other parts of the biliary tract;
  • Malignant neoplasms of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves;
  • Malignant neoplasms of the pancreas, penis and testis;
  • Malignant neoplasms of the placenta;
  • Malignant neoplasms of the small intestine;
  • Malignant neoplasms of the thymus;
  • Malignant neoplasms of the vulva, vagina and cervix uteri;
  • Malignant neuroendocrine neoplasm including carcinoid tumors;
  • Myeloid neoplasms;
  • Myelodysplastic syndromes;
  • Myeloproliferative neoplasms, and
  • Myeloid malignancies associated with eosinophilia.

 

If you have developed a rare cancer or any other type of cancer due to 9/11 exposure, speak to an experienced 9/11 lawyer as soon as possible. Turley Hansen & Partners have the resources and experience needed to represent first responders and survivors of 9/11. Call us today at 1-855-WTC-INFO (1-855-982-4636) to discuss a potential claim.